Lunch time defeat

Just two days ago I was substituting for a high school class and they had some down time at the end. I let them watch a video of American kids trying school lunches from around the world. The video is quite entertaining as the kids have some great reactions to new foods. However, I wasn’t showing it for just that! I wanted to kids to see that others kids’ lunches are compromised of more “real food” than ours.

They eat meat that is not processed into nugget form, they have vegetables that children are eating, and they do not have packaged snacks to go along with their lunches.

Let’s just admit defeat on this one and give the lunch program award to anyone but us!

I have this fear of sending my child to school and letting her eat the food. I also have a fear of school parties laden with candy in every color and soda in every flavor. As a mom who is health conscious, I have a hard time letting go of this one. There must be something else we can celebrate with rather than sugar filled, dyed, processed crappy food like items.

I mean if it was up to me kids would celebrate with a WOD and fill up on water, veggies, fruit, and maybe even some homemade no refined sugar banana bread. Sounds fun right?!

What do you do about your child and school lunches and/or parties?!

I am strong. I am capable. I am powerful. I am beautiful.

Xoxo,

Anne Nicole

Rise & Grind: 30 Jumping jacks, 15 sumo squats w/ toe raise at the bottom, 15/side curtsy lunges, 30 Mt. Climbers, 20/side leg extensions (on all fours, kick leg back then to the side), Hold a 1 min plank. Repeat this set 3x.

 

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. shanjeniah says:

    We place no arbitrary limits on what our children, 14 and almost 12, may eat. As they grow, it’s fascinating to see their tastes and awareness of how different foods affect them as they develop.

    A problem I have with controlling what children eat is that they WILL be exposed to a wide variety of foods in their lives, and what is denied or limited tends to take on the value of a holy grail. I’ve seen it over and over with children whose diets are controlled (and I used to do it to my own kids, as they remind me from time to time). They’re exposed to something forbidden or restricted, and they go crazy for it.

    It’s easy to control what a small child eats, but, as kids get older and more independent? It gets a lot harder, and the relationship between parent and child can suffer. With a teen and a pre-teen, I see that relationship as the most important thing – I want my children to be able to trust their parents during the high-stakes transition into adulthood that’s getting much closer than it seemed when they were babies. That’s easier when they know I don’t have an agenda when I say I think something might not be the best idea.

    Likewise, I’ve seen my kids hand me half a cookie because they were done, realize greasy foods didn’t agree with them, fall in love with green smoothies, realize they really don’t like chocolate that much, and ea carrots along with birthday cake.

    For me, it’s about trust. My own food, and my husband’s was controlled, and we both deal with residual effects of that, well into our middle years. I don’t always agree with the choices my children make, but I do see them both becoming competent and confident inhabitants of their bodies, and that makes me happier than if I was always enforcing a set of food rules they’d be sorely tempted to break any time they could.

    As for school lunches, they aren’t a part of our school-free lives. =D

    Boldly Going Through the Alphabet!
    @shanjeniah
    Part-Time Minion for Holton’s Heroes
    shanjeniah’s Lovely Chaos

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  2. Spotlight Gesundheit says:

    We promote a healthy diet at home by eating organic and kosher. I hope to pack healthy lunches when school starts. Then again, kids always traded lunch items when I went to school. The foods served in the cafeteria are vastly different from home cooked. I can see why you have reservations. I feel the same way!

    Liked by 1 person

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